CSMCE | Newsroom

  • The second Nebraska K-12 Science Education Summit will be held on Monday, Dec. 11, at the Nebraska Innovation Campus Conference Center. This summit is a one-day statewide event bringing together an array of stakeholders engaged in K-12 science education in the state of Nebraska. The summit will give participants the opportunity to get an update on Nebraska's new College- and Career-Ready Standards; explore 3-dimensional learning, phenomena and integrated science; learn about innovative K-12 science curriculum, resources, and programs developed by university faculty; and engage with science education stakeholders from across Nebraska. Presenters can propose a breakout session on the registration form.
  • Noyce Master Teachers Alicia Davis and Sherry West of Lincoln Public Schools have each been named state finalists for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) by their professional teaching organization, NATM.
  • Ken Gross, professor emeritus at the University of Vermont and founder of the nationally recognized Vermont Mathematics Initiative, passed away on Sept. 10, 2017. Ken helped inspire our Math in the Middle grant and taught Math 800T to some cohorts. Obituary
  • The NebraskaMATH community is deeply saddened that our friend Jessica Haley Thompson of Superior, a Math in the Middle graduate, Noyce Master Teacher and NMSSI instructor, passed away on Sept. 6. Jessica, a math teacher for Superior Public Schools, was in cohort 4 of Math in the Middle and became a leader in her profession. She continued to teach throughout her journey with cancer, which began in 2013. We will miss her greatly.Obituary
  • Join us for UNL’s Science and Engineering Expo Fair at Haymarket Park on August 21, the day of the 2017 solar eclipse! We will experience a total solar eclipse, bringing midnight darkness, at 1:02:36pm for a total of 1 minute and 24 seconds. The Lincoln Saltdogs baseball team has a daytime game scheduled for August 21, which will be billed as an "Eclipse-Delayed Game." You must have a ticket to attend the Saltdogs game but the Expo is free and outside the gates. The fair will start at 11 a.m. and be run right outside the stadium, on the open corridor along its gates, and end at 1:30 p.m.
  • The Nebraska Association of Teachers of Mathematics will hold its 2017 annual conference jointly with the Nebraska Association of Teachers of Science from Sept. 7-9 in Kearney. The NebraskaMATH Partnership invites all who are heading to Kearney for the conference to join us for Math and Science Teachers' Circles on Friday evening. The gathering will offer three sessions, one for elementary teachers, a second for secondary math teachers, and a third for secondary science teachers. The doors will open at 6 p.m., with dinner served at 6:30 p.m. and presentations to follow at 7 p.m. RSVP by August 30.
  • Congratulations to Paula Jakopovic, a NebraskaMATH doctoral graduate, and 18 additional Nebraska teachers who earned degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on Aug. 12, in part as a result of their participation in a NebraskaMATH program or the Nebraska Math and Science Summer Institutes.
  • In summer 2017, 300 distinct teachers in math and science education took a course through the Nebraska Math and Science Summer Institutes or other NebraskaMATH programs for a total of 535 registrations in 42 math, science and pedagogy classes. Courses were held in Ashland, Grand Island, Hastings, Kearney, Lincoln, Omaha and Papillion, as well as the additional TEAMS locations of Crete, Fremont, Norfolk, North Platte and Ogallala.
  • Amber Vlasnik, a math teacher at Lincoln High School and a NebraskaNOYCE Master Teaching Fellow, traveled to Washington, D.C., to be honored as the 2017 Nebraska Teacher of the Year in April 2017 and shared her experiences in our NebraskaMATH newsletter for May 2017.
  • Congratulations to our NebraskaMATH/Noyce doctoral graduate, Danielle Buhrman, and three Primarily Math teachers who earned master's degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on May 5, 2017, in part as a result of their participation in the UNL-LPS Partnership, NebraskaMATH/Noyce and the Nebraska Math and Science Summer Institutes. Buhrman earned her Ed.D. in Educational Studies, and is a a math teacher at Grand Island Senior High. These elementary teachers who participated in the Lincoln Public Schools cohort of Primarily Math from 2014-15 received a Master of Arts degree from the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education: Hannah Heyl (Prescott Elementary), Lindsey Licht (Prescott Elementary) and Carolyn Raguse, Wysong Elementary (formerly Prescott Elementary).
  • Mark your calendars for UNL’s Science and Engineering Expo Fair at Haymarket Park on August 21, the day of the 2017 solar eclipse! We will experience a total solar eclipse, bringing midnight darkness, at 1:02:36 p.m. for a total of 1 minute and 24 seconds. UNL is a host of this large public event in Lincoln, coinciding with the 2017 Solar Eclipse. The Lincoln Saltdogs baseball team has succeeded in getting a daytime game scheduled for August 21, which will be billed as an "Eclipse-Delayed Game." Contact us for more information.
  • Terri Norton, associate professor of construction engineering in The Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction at Nebraska, described her journey to becoming a Fulbright Scholar for 200 attendees of the 19th annual Women in Science Conference on March 31.
  • To meet the state’s and the nation’s need for more highly qualified science teachers, the 14-month Master of Arts with emphasis in science teaching (MAst) program was established in the College of Education’s Department of Teaching, Learning, and Teacher Education at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, along with a Robert Noyce, Track I, Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation, awarded in 2010. This report presents a summary of the accomplishments of this Noyce grant, in which 60 post-baccalaureate science majors and professionals were provided with Noyce stipends to become science teachers. The MAst program is now in its sixth year, producing an average of 10 new science teachers per year. The project team, led by Dr. Elizabeth Lewis, was also awarded a second Noyce grant in 2015 to support 30 more individuals to become science teachers along with funding to continue to research the practices of beginning science teachers. The MAst program engages science professionals in a research-informed program of study that supports them in developing the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to meet the challenges of the modern American secondary science classroom. Download the PDF.
  • Nearly 400 students and educators representing 132 schools from 34 states, Canada and Scotland will make their way to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for the 19th annual Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics, Feb. 3-5. This year, 202 students and 16 schools are in attendance for the first time. Nebraska faculty and staff can attend conference research presentations at no charge. Events are held on City Campus or at the Embassy Suites Hotel, 1040 P St.
  • Jim Lewis has become the Acting Assistant Director for Education and Human Resources (EHR) at the National Science Foundation. Lewis joined NSF in January 2015 as the Deputy Assistant Director of EHR from UNL, where he serves as director of the Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education.
  • Jenny Dauer, an assistant professor of natural resources, demonstrates in a forthcoming study, that teaching and using a seven-step decision-making model helps students become more scientifically literate, and has the potential to overcome subconscious biases and make better-informed decisions.
  • Augmented-reality technology is helping Earth and Atmospheric Sciences students visualize geologic features and explore landscape dynamics. EAS has built a sandbox with a computer with a stellar video card, a projector, a Microsoft Kinect gaming sensor and, of course, 200 pounds of sand, to help students better understand geologic formations and mentally translate the landscapes normally depicted on 2-D topographic maps. Check out this video with CSMCE faculty Mindi Searls and Leilani Arthurs.
  • Wendy Smith, associate director of the Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education, was presented with the Boss of the Year Award at the 36th annual University of Nebraska Office Professionals Association bosses luncheon on Nov. 8, 2016.
  • Amber Vlasnik, a math teacher at Lincoln High School and a NebraskaNOYCE Master Teaching Fellow, was named the 2017 Nebraska Teacher of the Year on Oct. 11. Vlasnik has taught at Lincoln High since 2011 and has served as the math department chair since 2014. During the next year, Vlasnik will serve as an ambassador for the state on teaching issues. Congratulations!
  • Judy Walker, Aaron Douglas Professor of Mathematics and interim associate vice chancellor for academic affairs at Nebraska, heads a new project, WATCH US, aimed at increasing the number of U.S. women with mathematics doctorates. It was one of 37 projects nationwide funded through the new National Science Foundation INCLUDES program to broaden participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM fields, by improving educational opportunities for underserved populations.
  • Nebraska has received part of a National Science Foundation grant, SEMINAL, designed to help mathematics departments adopt more effective instructional methods at the undergraduate level. Alongside the University of Colorado Boulder, San Diego State University and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, Nebraska’s Department of Mathematics will investigate how incorporating active-learning strategies can improve the instruction of precalculus-to-calculus 2, or P2C2.
  • Apply now to become a TEAMS teacher leader through a new grant with the NDE, Nebraska Partnership TEAMS. Teacher leaders are those who have leadership capacity and interest in participating in a project that will provide statewide professional development to math and science teachers. Applications must be submitted by Monday, Oct. 3. Stipends will be provided, along with travel and lodging costs. Three sets of sessions – dedicated to elementary-integrated STEM, secondary mathematics, and secondary Earth and space science, respectively – will address content that aligns with Nebraska State Standards.
  • A new $1 million grant from the Nebraska Department of Education will help UNL faculty coordinate a professional development project aimed at improving K-12 math and science instruction. With a focus on elevating academic achievement in Nebraska’s high-need schools, the project will establish professional development sessions at locations across the state, including Crete, Fremont, Grand Island, Norfolk, North Platte and Scottsbluff. Approximately 40 elementary and secondary teachers from participating schools will lead the sessions. The project, Nebraska Partnership TEAMS (Teaching to Enhance Achievement in Math and Science), is a collaboration between high-need Nebraska schools and UNL faculty from the Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education; the Department of Mathematics; the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; and the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education. To get involved, email us at nebraskamath@unl.edu.
  • Registration for SciComm 2016 is now open. SciComm is a two-day conference on effective science communication that will be held at UNL from Sept. 23-24, 2016. This conference provides an excellent opportunity to interact with and learn from other science communication enthusiasts. There is no fee to register for the broader impacts workshop or the Science Night Live! outreach event. However, there is a $20 registration fee for the Saturday symposium, which includes the cost of lunch and refreshments. Registration is capped at 300 participants. Flier
  • For those whose busy schedules require flexible scheduling in order to make taking graduate courses possible, the Department of Mathematics offers mathematics courses for teachers online on a regular basis. This fall, Math 804T and Math 811T will be offered and count toward the Master of Arts for Teachers degree. Fall registration is now open. Please contact Lindsay Augustyn for registration information.
  • UNL’s Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education recently gave 14 of Nebraska’s math and science educators the opportunity to visit the Kennedy Space Center for a three-day conference to inspire new curricula in their classrooms. The CSMCE supported the conference through its Midwest Noyce Connections grant, funded by the National Science Foundation. Nearly 100 teachers and university faculty attended the conference from Noyce projects in 12 Midwestern states.
  • Since 2011, UNL’s Noyce Master Teaching Fellows and Teaching Fellows have engaged in a wide variety of teacher leadership as mathematics teachers in high-need schools and districts in Nebraska. From becoming math coaches and leading professional development for peers, to giving presentations at national conferences and chairing curriculum committees, the 30 MTFs and 13 TFs demonstrate through their accomplishments the accumulation of efforts by the Center of Science, Mathematics and Computer Education to form school-university partnerships that can provide opportunities for teacher leadership. The NebraskaNOYCE grant was funded by the National Science Foundation, as was a Phase II grant to allow us to continue to study these remarkable Noyce teachers. Contact us to receive a copy of this booklet in the mail or click here to download a PDF.
  • Congratulations to Dr. Darla Berks of Lincoln Public Schools for being named the 2016 Don Miller Math Award recipient. "I won this by having amazing people impact me along the way. The educator role is definitely not a solo event. Thanks to Dr. Jim Lewis, Dr. Matt Larson, Dr. Lorraine Males, Dr. Amy Nebesniak, Amber Vlasnik and Delise Andrews ... look what we won!" said Berks, a Noyce Master Teaching Fellow and Math in the Middle graduate. Each year since 1992, the Lincoln Rotary Club #14 presents the Donald W. Miller Math Recognition Award to recognize outstanding mathematics educators in the Lincoln area. The club endowed this award in honor of former member, past club president and Rotary leader, Donald W. Miller, a former UNL mathematics professor. Noyce teachers Susie Katt (2009), Sherry West (2011), Jerel Welker (2013) and Delise Andrews (2014), as well as UNL's Lewis (2015), have been recipients of this award.
  • Nebraska teachers who have graduated from the Master of Arts with an emphasis in science teaching (MAst) program in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education gathered for a reunion of sorts May 14 in Henzlik Hall. They spent their Saturday in a professional development day to address their teaching needs. The teachers came from Lincoln Public Schools (LPS), Omaha Public Schools and many other districts in Nebraska. One even came from a district in Colorado. A few MAst program students who recently completed their student teaching in LPS joined them. The MAst graduates attended sessions on using technology in their science classrooms, how to provide students with feedback on their work, how to work effectively with special education co-teachers and how to organize field trips and apply for grants. There was also a discipline-based lesson sharing session in which teachers recommended effective science activities to each other. According to Lewis, the science teachers also benefited from networking with each other before, during, and after the individual professional development sessions. The planning committee was composed of Lewis and one person from each of the five MAst cohorts: Nathan Van Meter, Cohort 1, Louisville Public Schools; Kristoff Berzins, Cohort 2, Omaha Public Schools; Kay Burbach, Cohort 3, Lincoln Public Schools; Ethan Van Winkle, Cohort 4, Lincoln Public Schools; and Blair Kalinski, Cohort 5, UNL graduate student. The planning committee also generated the topics for the workshop sessions.
  • Native students continue to be underrepresented throughout U.S. universities and colleges, especially in engineering and science programs. The problem is especially troubling because these fields represent the fastest-growing occupations in the country, leaving many looking for ways to bridge this gap. Mark Griep, associate professor of chemistry at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and his team may have found a solution. In partnership with tribal colleges throughout the United States, they created sustainable, and culturally and locally relevant, laboratory experiences so Native students can study topics significant to their communities. Students and teachers share these methods locally and regionally through workshops, outreach and recruitment. "The Sharing Cycle of Science Learning: Connecting Community Topics to Tribal College Lab Courses" by Griep, Beverly R. DeVore-Wedding, Janyce Woodward and Hank Miller, published in the spring 2016 issue of Great Plains Quarterly, describes this innovative educational process.
  • Ruth Heaton, Gilmartin Professor of Mathematics Education in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education, has been elected to a two-year term as co-chair of the Research in Mathematics Education special interest group (SIG) of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). Her term begins following the 2016 AERA Annual Meeting, April 8-12. Co-chairing responsibilities include organizing the SIG conference programs at both the AERA national conference and the Research Pre-session of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) national conference. She’ll also help coordinate AERA award programs in the SIG for an early career publication award and a senior scholar award.
  • Math Early On has published “Learning the Language of Nature: Young Children as Mathematical Thinkers,” created by the ‪CSMCE, which shares images of children's early intellectual discoveries and describes the partnership between the Math Early On grant, supported by the Buffett Early Childhood Fund, and Educare of Omaha. Researchers Ruth Heaton and Carolyn Edwards shared this publication and their math program processes during a visit to Reggio Emilia in Italy in March 2016.
  • Watch the Global Math Department webinar with Noyce Master Teacher and 2015 Nebraska Teacher of the Year Shelby Aaberg, "Bringing the World Outside School Into Your Math Classroom." Everyone’s got problems (of the math variety), especially people outside your school. Whether it’s an oil storage tank in an auto shop, a mailbox on a mail carrier’s route, or raising public awareness about rabies-infected skunks, seeing the math in the world is easy. Turning that math into a lesson or an activity for students is the tricky part. We will see examples of engaging math problems from the community. We will discuss a teacher’s considerations when deciding how to incorporate problems from the world outside school and some of the challenges teachers may encounter when collaborating with people outside the education world.
  • Dr. Troy Sadler, professor of science education at the University of Missouri and director of the ReSTEM Institute: Reimagining and Researching STEM Education, will speak at UNL on Thursday, March 17, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Henzlik Hall Auditorium. His talk, "Socio-scientific Issues as a Central Element of Scientific Literacy: Toward a Framework for K-16 Teaching and Learning," is sponsored by IANR's Science Literacy program at UNL.
  • Nearly 100 high school girls will learn about science careers and meet women who excel in them while visiting the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for the 18th annual Women in Science Conference on Feb. 19-20. Representing 27 high schools from across Nebraska and Kansas, participants will engage in workshops and discussions led by female chemists, computer scientists, engineers, geologists, biologists and others.
  • The CSMCE is pleased to announce that it’s bringing the Primarily Math program to Holdrege this summer 2016. This is the first time Primarily Math has been offered in southwestern Nebraska. Thanks to an Improving Teacher Quality grant from the U.S. Department of Education awarded through the Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education and an award from Women Investing in Nebraska in October 2015, this new cohort of Primarily Math: Greater Nebraska will begin May 31, 2016, in Holdrege. Applications from grades K-3 teachers are due March 15, 2016.
  • Marilyne Stains, assistant professor of chemistry and CSMCE faculty, has earned a five-year $941,174 Faculty Early Career Development Program Award from the National Science Foundation to comprehensively study university STEM teaching and to improve programs that train faculty to better teach science. These prestigious grants, known as CAREER awards, support pre-tenure faculty who exemplify the role of teachers-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research.
  • Nearly 300 students and educators from 37 states, the District of Columbia and Canada will make their way to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for the 18th annual Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics on Jan. 29-31, 2016.
  • Congratulations to the four Primarily Math teachers and one New Teacher Network teacher who earned master's degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on Dec. 18. All four Primarily Math teachers were from Omaha Public Schools. Jennifer Kaminski and Miranda McAreavey Mull of Benson West Elementary, Angela Rosenthal of Masters Elementary, and Megan Zitek of Western Hills Magnet received their Master of Arts degrees from the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education. The group included three teachers from the OPS TLA’s first cohort of Primarily Math and one from the NSF-funded NebraskaMATH cohort 4 in Omaha. Lee Plath of Culler Middle School in Lincoln Public Schools earned his Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) degree from the Department of Mathematics. Plath was in the New Teacher Network and the LPS Title 1 cohort of Math in the Middle.
  • More than 100 Nebraska high schools will bring 1,657 students to the 26th annual University of Nebraska-Lincoln Math Day on Nov. 19. The event is hosted by the Department of Mathematics. Lincoln Southeast High School is bringing a record number of 119 students to Math Day this year.
  • The MoSAIC Festival, a traveling exhibit celebrating the Mathematics of Science, Art, Industry and Culture, will visit the University of Nebraska-Lincoln from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 14 and 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 15 in the Nebraska Union. The free public festival consists of lectures, hands-on workshops, short films and an art exhibit. Presentation topics include origami, famed graphic artist M.C. Escher, tessellations, Persian mosaics, geometry and design, ceramics and quilting. Activities and workshops scheduled for Nov. 14 will feature mathematical content aimed at higher-level audiences, while the Nov. 15 workshops are especially suited for families and students in grades 5-12. Omaha Public Schools fifth-grade teacher Sondra Bravo will be presenting a workshop at 1 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday. For more information, click here.
  • Congratulations to Dan Schaben of Arapahoe Public School in Arapahoe, Nebraska, for being one of five finalists for the 2016 Nebraska Teacher of the Year award. Schaben, a Noyce Master Teacher and Math in the Middle graduate, will be recognized as an Award of Excellence winner, along with Lori Boudreau of Papillion‐La Vista High School, Lynn Hill of Millard South High School and Jayson Stoddard of Hastings Middle School. Tim Royers, a social studies teacher at Millard West High School, was named the 2016 Nebraska Teacher of the Year. Nebraska Commissioner of Education Matt Blomstedt and Deputy Commissioner Deborah Frison presented the award.
  • To advance the teaching of science, technology, engineering and math, UNL researchers are stepping forward with a retreat. Taking place Oct. 19 at UNL’s Avery Hall, the STEM Education Research Retreat will assemble more than 50 faculty, postdoctoral researchers, graduate students and undergraduates. Participants will represent more than 20 departments that cover disciplines ranging from the agricultural, biological and physical sciences to biomedical, computer and mechanical engineering. In addition to learning about UNL’s research infrastructure, participants will share information about their latest projects through roundtable discussions and a gallery walk featuring 25 research posters. Marilyne Stains, assistant professor of chemistry and coordinator of the retreat, said the event should cultivate greater collaboration among the many UNL researchers dedicated to improving STEM education. To familiarize participants with resources that can assist this ambitious effort, the retreat’s planning committee has invited centers and offices from across the City and East campuses. These include the Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education; the Center for Instructional Innovation; the Nebraska Bureau for Education Research, Evaluation and Policy; the Bureau of Sociological Research; NU’s Public Policy Center; and the Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Consortium. For more information, click here.
  • Primarily Math, a program of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln with objectives to transform K–3 mathematics education in Nebraska, has received a $53,700 grant award from Women Investing in Nebraska. The program is an initiative of the Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education, the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Teacher Education. The university will use the funding to offer the Primarily Math program, which started with the National Science Foundation grant NebraskaMATH in 2009, to even more high-need school districts across the state. It helps teachers with their own knowledge of mathematics and improves the teaching of mathematics in primary school grades. “Receiving this award is an honor because it provides us with the opportunity to continue to work with a group of outstanding individuals: the teachers charged with educating Nebraska’s children,” said Michelle Homp, research assistant professor with the UNL Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education. “We believe that no endeavor is more worthy, and we’re very grateful to Women Investing in Nebraska.” Primarily Math will begin assembling a cohort in 2016. The WIN grant will be used to partially fund tuition for accepted teachers. “Women Investing in Nebraska’s investment in Primarily Math means more elementary school students will receive great mathematics education in their classrooms,” said Lisa Smith, chair of the Women Investing in Nebraska executive committee. “It’s incredible to know how important this will be for Nebraska’s teachers and their students.”
  • Congratulations to the 42 Nebraska teachers who will earn master's degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on Aug. 15, in part as a result of their participation in NebraskaMATH or the Nebraska Math and Science Summer Institutes. Three pre-service mathematics teachers also graduated with a Master of Arts in Mathematics Teaching. Twenty-five of the 42 teachers completed the Math in the Middle program through the Omaha Public Schools Teacher Leader Academy and will earn a Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) from the Department of Mathematics. These OPS teachers are: Wade Anderson (Indian Hill), Sondra Bravo (Catlin Magnet), James Cattau (Belle Ryan), Ty Copsey (Prairie Wind), Doni Coulter (Saddlebrook), Maggie Douglas (Wilson Focus), Tom Gamble (Wilson Focus), Hannah Holguin (Bryan Middle), RJ Kammandel (McMillan Magnet), Mariel Kloppenborg (Lewis and Clark), Tricia Krause (Rose Hill), Lindsay Larsen (Indian Hill), Tracy Larson (Alice Buffett Magnet), Kristy Lee (R M Marrs Magnet), Dawn McKain (Alice Buffett Magnet), Kenzi Medeiros (Lewis and Clark), Molly Mertz (Lewis and Clark), Karen Mohrbutter (McMillan Magnet), Jennifer Olsen (Alice Buffett Magnet), Heather Osborne (Prairie Wind), Julie Preston (McMillan Magnet), Amy Smith (R M Marrs Magnet), Amy Swartzendruber (Indian Hill), Heather Waddell (Alice Buffett Magnet) and Ginny Yuhas (TAC). An additional five OPS teachers will earn their MAT degree through the OPS New Teacher Network or NMSSI programs: Erin Carder (Burke High), Duncan Davidson (Burke High), Kim McCoy (Bryan High) and Scott Rice (Central) and Alexandra Sitko (Burke High). Nine secondary teachers from across the state also will earn their MAT, through a combination of the NebraskaMATH NSF-funded New Teacher Network and the NMSSI. They are: Stefanie Edwards (Broken Bow), Carol Goans (Lincoln Southeast), Lindsey Harders (GI Northwest), Emily Kroenke (Papillion-La Vista South), Tony Jacobsen (Crete), Sam Robb (Twin River), Emily Romkema (Santee), Keith Schroetlin (Wisner-Pilger) and April Sypal (David City Aquinas), plus a community college instructor and former K-12 teacher Melissa Kosch (Central Community College). Two elementary teachers who previously completed Primarily Math will receive a Master of Arts degree from the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education: Andrew Boone (Thomas Elementary in Gretna) and Dana Henry (St. Paul). The three MAmt graduates will start teaching this fall at the following schools: Marta Bukowski (Dawes Middle School, Lincoln), Clint Pettit (Omaha North High) and Lydia Wingfield (Lincoln North Star High). Two NebraskaMATH leaders also will earn their doctorate degrees on Aug. 15. Lincoln High coordinator Darla Kelberlau-Berks, a Noyce Master Teacher and Math in the Middle graduate who helps teach NebraskaMATH courses, receives an Ed.D. and Elizabeth Cunningham, who taught several courses for Primarily Math, earns a Ph.D. and will teach at the University of Michigan in Flint.
  • Nebraska's proposed math standards aim to teach deeper understanding, not more concepts, says Matt Larson, math curriculum specialist for the Lincoln Public Schools and current NCTM president, in an Omaha World-Herald article in August 2015. The photo features Primarily Math teacher Liz Cook.
  • Scottsbluff High School math teacher and UNL Noyce Master Teaching Fellow Shelby Aaberg was designated as a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching for 2013 on July 1, 2015. Included in the selection was a trip to Washington, D.C., (see photos at PAEMST link) and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation.
  • June 15-19, 2015, was Nebraska Pollinator Week, and Doug Golick, assistant professor in the department of entomology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, was featured for his Bumbleboosters work in the Omaha World-Herald on June 15.
  • Vote for NebraskaMATH's Primarily Math video, produced by University Communications at UNL, in the NSF 2015 Teaching and Learning Video Showcase: Improving Science, Math, Engineering and Computer Science Education. From May 11-15, this online event will showcase cutting-edge NSF-funded work to improve teaching and learning of STEM and CS. We invite you to view the videos, join the conversation, and vote for Primarily Math as your favorite presentation on the NSF video showcase site.
  • Congratulations to the three Primarily Math teachers who earned master's degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on May 8. Ann Dirks of Western Hills Magnet Elementary in the Omaha Public Schools (OPS), Maris Taylor of South Primary in the Blair Community Schools and Julie Trimble of Saddlebrook Elementary in OPS received their Master of Arts degrees from the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education. The group included two teachers from the NSF-funded cohort 4 in Omaha and one from the OPS TLA’s first cohort of Primarily Math.
  • Jim Lewis, Aaron Douglas Professor of Mathematics and director of the CSMCE, earned the Award for Impact on the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics for 2015. The Impact Award was established by the AMS Committee on Education in 2013, and is given annually to a mathematician who has made significant contributions of lasting value to mathematics education.
  • NebraskaMATH received recognition at the outset of the inaugural National Math Festival in Washington, D.C., which kicked off on April 16 with a policy briefing attended by Congressional delegations from Nebraska and other states. The policy breakfast highlighted four programs from across the country.
  • Math Studio, part of the $5.5 million OPS TLA grant funded by The Sherwood Foundation and the Lozier Foundation to improve math instruction in the Omaha Public Schools, was featured in the Omaha World-Herald on Feb. 26.
  • UNL’s Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education will help more than 80 high school girls explore science careers when it hosts the 17th annual Women in Science Conference Feb. 13-14 in Lincoln.
  • Nearly 300 students from 34 states, as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, will present research during the 17th annual Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics, Jan. 23-25. The conference will offer outstanding undergraduate women mathematicians at all stages of their careers opportunities to discuss their research and to meet other women who share their interest in mathematical sciences. For more information about the conference, go here.
  • UNL faculty Jim Lewis will contribute his respective expertise to advancing U.S. efforts in education and mathematics by assuming a leadership position with the National Science Foundation. Lewis, an Aaron Douglas Professor of Mathematics, will become deputy assistant director of the NSF Directorate for Education and Human Resources beginning Jan. 26. He has accepted an initial one-year appointment.
  • Jim Lewis, director of UNL’s Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education, will receive the Mathematical Association of America’s highest award for service at a Jan. 11 session of the Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Antonio. The association will present Lewis with the Gung and Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics, which annually honors extraordinary contributions that have shaped mathematics and mathematical education on a national scale. “One thing that really stands out when I consider this award is that the list of former winners includes so many people I admire as giants in the mathematics profession,” said Lewis, an Aaron Douglas Professor of mathematics. “It is quite humbling to be recognized by one’s peers as worthy of this award.” Lewis previously served as chair of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences, a national umbrella organization that fosters collaboration among 17 professional societies dedicated to promoting research, improving education and expanding applications of mathematics. He also headed a committee that oversaw the creation of “The Mathematical Education of Teachers,” one of several standard-bearing reports on teacher preparation and professional development to which he has contributed. “My father was a physics teacher who benefited from participation in one of the original National Science Foundation institutes in the late 1950s,” Lewis said. “I’ve always felt that one of the most important ways that I could contribute as a mathematician is to create opportunities for K-12 teachers to learn mathematics and become better educators.” Under Lewis’ direction, the UNL Department of Mathematics won a 1998 National Science Foundation Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. During his 15-year tenure as the department’s chair, the proportion of doctorates awarded to women rose from zero to 40 percent in tandem with an overall increase in the number of doctorates granted. “Jim has personally developed and supported the development of mathematics enrichment programs for K-12 students and teachers,” said Judy Walker, current chair of the department. “His work has made an enormous impact on the mathematical education of students both nationally and in Nebraska. “He has also worked tirelessly to raise the profile of K-16 mathematics education concerns, including equity and diversity, in the larger mathematics community,” Walker said. “He is exceptionally worthy of this award.”
  • The Association for Science Teacher Education (ASTE) has selected Jon Pedersen, associate dean for research in the UNL College of Education and Human Sciences and science education director for the Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education, for its Outstanding Longtime Service Award. Pedersen received the award at the ASTE Annual Conference in Portland, Ore., in January.
  • Professor David Harwood's innovative geosciences field course for science teachers, which is offered as part of the Nebraska Math and Science Summer Institutes, will be featured at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 7 on Nebraska Educational Television. The show, "Rockin' the Big Red Van," will be the third segment in the hourlong "Nebraska Stories" program. A link to the video can be found on YouTube.
  • Dr. Matthew R. Larson, mathematics curriculum specialist for Lincoln Public Schools, has been elected as the next president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). Larson will serve one year as president-elect (2015–2016), working closely with President Diane Briars before assuming the full duties of president for a two-year term beginning in the spring of 2016.
  • With nearly $1 million of support from the National Science Foundation, an interdisciplinary team from UNL and UNO is crafting a curriculum that will allow students to learn the science behind the fashion-forward technology. The three-year project will offer inquiry-based activities to roughly 900 students in grades 4-6 who attend public school in Nebraska and is led by CSMCE youth engagement director Brad Barker, associate professor and 4-H science and technology specialist.
  • Shelby Aaberg, a mathematics teacher at Scottsbluff High School and a Noyce Master Teaching Fellow, was named Nebraska 2015 Teacher of the Year on Oct. 10, 2014, during a surprise award presentation. Aaberg was one of four finalists for the award. Scottsbluff Public Schools Superintendent Richard Myles said leadership is one of Aaberg’s most important talents.
  • Learning the life sciences in the 21st century and beyond is about much more than memorizing information for a test and then moving on to the next subject. Students must learn in a more dynamic environment that ties the threads of science together into a whole from the start of their undergraduate experience, say UNL professors leading an effort to develop new teaching methods that meet these demands. The project is funded by a four-year, $2,321,012 grant from the National Science Foundation. Currently, life sciences teaching works like this, said Joe Dauer, assistant professor in the School of Natural Resources: "You start cramming as much knowledge as you can into a student’s head their freshman year, in pieces, and you hope students over time figure out how to connect things." Tomas Helikar, assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and principal investigator for the grant, said the new approach will be in contrast to "the way I learned — rote memorization from textbooks, static pictures, and so on. We need to be more dynamic."
  • The University of Nebraska Foundation has released this video on YouTube of the amazing field experience that is GEOS 898: Methods in Geoscience Field Instruction, offered through the Nebraska Math and Science Summer Institutes. Teachers who embark on this 14-day inquiry-based field course come away with a one-of-a-kind experience. This immersion adventure travels through Nebraska, Wyoming and South Dakota in June, and aims to demonstrate effective teaching methods that can integrate geoscience into K-12 learning environments. View this video to hear first-hand accounts from science teachers about their experiences. NET is also working on a video about the field course, which will be broadcast in November as part of the NET series 'Nebraska Stories.'
  • In the article, To teach better, this cohort returns to math class, LPS highlights the coursework being completed by 80 LPS teachers in the summer of 2014 through Primarily Math and Math in the Middle programs.
  • The American Statistical Association (ASA) has issued recommendations regarding the use of value-added models (VAM) in research, which is used by Data Connections. The ASA endorses wise use of data, statistical models, and designed experiments for improving the quality of education. Read the statement here.
  • Primarily Math is on course to continue into the future, as new cohorts of Nebraska teachers take part in professional development and community building. Now, Math Early On, an exciting new venture is just beginning. Based on Primarily Math's successful ideas and practices regarding what mathematical and pedagogical content, teachers of young children will have the opportunity to strengthen their capacities as teachers of young children by participating in Math Early On. This project is funded by the Buffett Early Childhood Fund and will pilot a program of professional development around mathematics for preschool teachers in the Educare Learning Network, beginning with the Educare schools of Lincoln and Omaha in 2014-2015. Ruth Heaton, Carolyn Edwards, and Victoria Molfese are project directors.
  • Yinjing Shen, graduate research assistant for Primarily Math and a student in Child, Youth and Family Studies, won the Graduate Student Research and Creativity Award from the College of Education and Human Sciences. She is being honored during a reception on April 18 at 10 a.m. at the Sheldon Art Gallery.
  • Robert Pappalardo, a visiting scientist from NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab, will discuss "Ice and Oceans in the Outer Solar System," in a 7:30 p.m. lecture April 14 in the Nebraska Union Auditorium. The talk is free and open to the public. The talk will include information about how Jupiter's frozen moon Europa could be hiding an ocean of life. Pappalardo is visiting three UNL departments — physics and astronomy, earth and atmospheric sciences and biological sciences. He is a senior research scientist at the California Institute of Technology and an expert on Europa.
  • Alysia Augustus, a Papillion-La Vista teacher from Primarily Math Cohort 2, was named as one of Nebraska's two winners of the prestigious Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, announced on Dec. 20, 2013. The educators will receive their awards at a Washington, D.C., event in the coming year. Each year the award alternates between teachers teaching kindergarten through 6th grade and those teaching 7th through 12th grades. The 2012 awardees named today teach kindergarten through 6th grade. Winners of this Presidential honor receive a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation to be used at their discretion.
  • Congratulations to five teachers who earned master's degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on Dec. 13, 2013, in part as a result of their participation in NebraskaMATH or the Nebraska Math and Science Summer Institutes. Two teachers earned a Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) from the Department of Mathematics: Alicia Davis, Scott Middle School, Lincoln Public Schools; and Matt James, Southwest High School, Lincoln Public Schools. Kim Ocampo of Laurel-Concord also earned a MAT degree. Three elementary teachers who participated in Primarily Math earned a Master of Arts degree from the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education: Jessica Dickes, Thomas Elementary, Gretna Public Schools; Nanette Kissler, Lincoln Heights Elementary, Scottsbluff Public Schools; and Cassie Krueger, Adams Elementary, Lincoln Public Schools.
  • Seven Nebraska middle and high school mathematics teachers who are NSF Robert Noyce Master Teaching Fellows through the University of Nebraska-Lincoln earned National Professional Board Certification during the 2013 application cycle. These seven teachers have doubled the number of active mathematics Board-certified teachers in Nebraska from seven to 14. Ten Nebraska teachers earned certification in any subject in 2013, bringing the total number of teachers in the state with active board certification to 86. The 2013 Board-certified mathematics teachers from the Noyce program are: Shelby Aaberg, Scottsbluff High School, Scottsbluff Public Schools; Danielle Buhrman, Grand Island Senior High School, Grand Island Public Schools; Alicia Davis, Scott Middle School, Lincoln Public Schools; Katie Garcia, Bryan High School, Omaha Public Schools; Jill Luschen, Alice Buffett Magnet Middle School, Omaha Public Schools; Dan Schaben, Arapahoe Public School; and Katie Soto, Lincoln Southeast High School, Lincoln Public Schools.
  • NebraskaMATH OPS TLA Primarily Math teacher Angela Holdren earned National Professional Board Certification in 2013 in the category of generalist/early education. Holdren is a teacher at King Elementary.
  • Tiffany Heng-Moss has received the 2013 National Teaching Award for Food and Agriculture Sciences. Heng-Moss, a professor of entomology who is highly involved with science education for the CSMCE, was one of two professors in the nation to be honored by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.
  • This spring, the UNL Department of Mathematics will offer Math 805T: Discrete Mathematics for Teachers (Class # 24135), taught by UNL's Dr. Annika Denkert, as an online course. The semester begins January 13, so you will need to have completed your registration in either MyRED or through Teach Nebraska by December 20. To read more about the MAT online degree, please visit: http://online.unl.edu/math.
  • Thirteen UNL faculty members have been selected for the 2013-14 Research Development Fellows Program, an initiative to help pre-tenure faculty successfully compete for grants. Two of them are closely affiliated with the Center: Yvonne Lai in mathematics and Joe Dauer in natural resources.
  • Mark Griep, associate professor of chemistry and instructor for the NMSSI's CHEM 898 course, will be the principal investigator on a five-year, $749,000 National Science Foundation grant to work with tribal colleges to develop a chemistry curriculum that incorporates real-world topics from the communities the colleges serve. The grant, a Research Infrastructure Improvement Track 3 award, is part of a pilot program through NSF and EPSCoR to target underrepresented populations in STEM fields. Griep applied for the grant upon learning that Nebraska Indian Community College in Macy, Neb., hadn't offered chemistry courses in six years.
  • UNL associate dean and CSMCE science director Jon Pedersen is an editor of the new book, "Going Back for Our Future: Carrying Forward the Spirit of Pioneers of Science Education." This book is the first volume of an attempt to capture and record memories from the pioneers themselves or from those who worked closely with them. The other editors are Kevin D. Finson, Bradley University; Barbara S. Spector, University of South Florida; and Paul Jablon, Lesley University.
  • NebraskaMATH colleagues Marge Petit and her daughter Liz Cunningham spent a week in Alaska training teachers as part of the Ongoing Assessment Project, which is based on the math education research on how kids learn mathematics. Petit is an independent educational consultant focusing on mathematics instruction and assessment who is on the NebraskaMATH leadership team. Cunningham is a doctoral candidate at UNL. She is currently a research assistant and instructor for Primarily Math.
  • The Department of Entomology's open house will be held on Sunday, Sept. 15, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Entomology Hall on East Campus. Parking north of the union and admission are free, and the event is open to the public. Come and meet the professors, the students, and the bugs! There will be laboratory tours, a fly tying demonstration, bionic bugs, information on pollinators and bedbugs, and a bee swarm demonstration (weather permitting).
  • The University of Nebraska-Lincoln was awarded a $2 million WIDER grant from the National Science Foundation in August 2013. The grant, Adopting Research-Eased Instructional Strategies for Enhancing STEM Education, aims at bridging the gap between research and practice in STEM education. Lance Perez, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, is the Principal Investigator, while the co-PIs are Ruth Heaton, Teaching, Learning, and Teacher Education; Kevin Lee, Physics and Astronomy; Marilyne Stains, Chemistry; and Leilani Arthurs, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The project is drawing upon prior research on effective pedagogies and theories of change to effect institutional transformation in undergraduate STEM education with a particular emphasis on introductory classes where student attrition is most pronounced.
  • Helping students improve their math skills by investing in outstanding math teachers is behind the logic of a $5.5 million grant made by two Omaha foundations, The Sherwood Foundation and the Lozier Foundation. This grant to the University of Nebraska Foundation supports a three-year partnership between Omaha Public Schools and UNL's Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education to form the NebraskaMATH Omaha Public Schools Teacher Leader Academy. Fifty-five teachers have been accepted to the 2013 cohorts of either Math in the Middle or Primarily Math.
  • Doug Golick is trying to generate a little buzz. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln assistant professor of entomology is working to craft the ideal bumblebee domicile - and he's turning to the public to get the project off the ground. "This is a citizen science project," Golick said. "We are crowdsourcing the funding. Everyone who makes a pledge gets to take part in the research." Working through Kickstarter, a company that provides tools to raise funds for creative projects, Golick is pursuing $3,300. The money will be used to build bumblebee nest boxes and develop a website for data collection.
  • Congratulations to Math in the Middle teachers Tanya Archie and Patrick Derr and Primarily Math Cohort 2 teacher Heather Bryan, who are 2013 Alice Buffett Outstanding Teacher award winners from Omaha Public Schools. The Omaha World-Herald announced the 15 winners on May 13. Archie, a math teacher Benson High; Derr, a sixth-grade teacher at Springville Elementary; and Bryan, a kindergarten teacher at Ashland Park-Robbins Elementary, each received a medallion, $10,000 cash and $500 in McDonald's gift certificates. Archie was featured in a full story in the World-Herald on May 10.
  • Dr. Civil meeting with the Noyce Master Teaching FellowsOn April 12-13, 2013, NebraskaNOYCE sponsored a visit by Dr. Marta Civil from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She met with the Noyce Master Teaching Fellows and their colleagues for a workshop on the intersection of ELL students, families, and mathematics, and how teachers can work to effectively engage families in supporting student mathematics learning. Dr. Civil’s research interests focus on teacher education and equity in mathematics education, particularly on a socio-cultural approach to the teaching of mathematics, equity and parental engagement. She has directed several initiatives aimed at engaging children ages 8-13 in mathematics and science in informal and after-school settings, as well as directed programs focused on parental engagement in mathematics.
  • The American Mathematical Society announced on April 17, 2013, that the Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics has been chosen as the annual winner of its Programs that Make a Difference Award for "its significant efforts to encourage women to continue in the study of mathematics," according to the announcement published April 15 in the AMS news journal, Notices of the AMS. Click here for more.
  • "Primarily Math: Success Stories" tells the story of Primarily Math, a teaching, research and development program for K-3 teachers. Over the past four years, 227 outstanding Nebraska elementary teachers have participated in this program. Enjoy this magazine's stories and classroom photos, more of which can be seen in the slideshow on the Primarily Math page, and download a PDF copy of the magazine.
  • Professor Jim Lewis and math department chair Judy Walker are interviewed in an Omaha World-Herald article on March 12, 2013, about Nebraska's refusal to adopt the Common Core State Standards.
  • Danielle Buhrman, a teacher at Grand Island High School and a Noyce Master Teaching Fellow, was featured in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' daily news brief on Dec. 10, 2012. The article highlighted Buhrman's website, which features videos of lessons designed to help her students receive assistance with their school work 24/7. For more on the story check out the Smartbrief, or read the Grand Island Independent.
  • The Omaha World-Herald featured the work UNL has been doing with mathematics education in the elementary schools on Dec. 5 with a front page article. To read the full story, click here.
  • Angela Mosier, math department chair at Westside High School in Omaha, was named the 2013 Nebraska Teacher of the Year on Oct. 15, 2012. Mosier, a Nebraska Algebra and NMSSI participant, was given the award by Nebraska Education Commissioner Roger Breed.
  • Assistant Professor Marilyny Stains of chemistry, along with the Center's technology director Dr. Kevin Lee of physics and astronomy, was awarded in September 2012 the $300,000 NSF grant "WIDER: EAGER: Evidence-Based Instructional Practices in Action: Enhancing Exemplary Teaching at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln." Their project assesses the state of instructional practices in courses offered in the biology, chemistry, and physics and astronomy departments at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL). Building on these data, the project will provide a professional development program on evidence-based instructional practices targeting faculty in these departments. Additionally, the project seeks to enhance and broaden of the use of peer instruction and just-in-time teaching in the biology, chemistry, and physics & astronomy courses, and establish the effectiveness of the professional development program through an assessment of the use of these practices by the participants and impact on students. The project seeks to implement a professional development program on evidence-based instructional practices for chemistry, biology, and physics and astronomy faculty at UNL, as well as train current and future faculty in the implementation of such a program. One of the outcomes of the professional development program will be the widening of the implementation of evidence-based instructional practices in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses at the institution, which will enhance students' learning environments. This project has the realistic potential of increasing the retention of all students in these STEM courses, and subsequently in STEM majors.
  • NEWS RELEASE: LPS' Hartman wins Presidential Award for mathematics teaching
  • Congratulations to Primarily Math Cohort 2 teacher Kerri Kratina, who is a 2012 Alice Buffett Outstanding Teacher award winner. The Omaha World-Herald announced the 15 winners on May 12. Kratina, a kindergarten teacher at Saddlebrook Elementary in Omaha Public Schools, received a medallion, $10,000 cash and $500 in McDonald's gift certificates.
  • Watch a video featuring NebraskaMATH co-Principal Investigator Carolyn Pope Edwards, winner of the Outstanding Research and Creative Activity (ORCA) Award.
  • Watch a video featuring Tiffany Heng-Moss, professor of entomology at UNL, winner of the Outstanding Teaching and Instructional Creativity Award (OTICA).
  • NEWS RELEASE: 112 elementary teachers chosen for Primarily Math 2012, 04-16-2012
  • NEWS RELEASE:, 04/09/2012: University of Nebraska President James B. Milliken announced the 2012 winners of the university's most prestigious awards for research, teaching and engagement. The Outstanding Research and Creative Activity (ORCA) Award, recognizing individual faculty members for outstanding research or creative activity of national or international significance, was awarded to NebraskaMATH co-Principal Investigator Carolyn Pope Edwards, Willa Cather Professor in the Department of Child, Youth and Family Studies and the Department of Psychology at UNL.
  • NEWS RELEASE:, 04/09/2012: University of Nebraska President James B. Milliken announced the 2012 winners of the university's most prestigious awards for research, teaching and engagement. The Outstanding Teaching and Instructional Creativity Award (OTICA), recognizing individual faculty members who have demonstrated meritorious and sustained records of excellence and creativity in teaching, was awarded to Tiffany Heng-Moss, professor of entomology at UNL. Heng-Moss is actively involved with the efforts of the Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education. She has developed an innovative teaching program that spans grade school, undergraduate, graduate and adult education; established a successful research program; and led one of the university's most effective distance education programs.
  • NEWS RELEASE, 04/04/2012: Kevin Lee, Research Assistant Professor in the Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education and Physics & Astronomy, was recognized with the AAPT 2012 David Halliday and Robert Resnick Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Physics Teaching. This award is given in recognition of contributions to undergraduate physics teaching and awardees are chosen for their extraordinary accomplishments in communicating the excitement of physics to their students.
  • UNL Department of Mathematics Chair and NMSSI professor Judy Walker earned a named university professorship, as an Aaron Douglas professor. Supported by the Office of the Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, she will be recognized at the Honors Convocation on April 22, 2012. The professorship honors NU alumnus Aaron Douglas (1899-1979). He was the first African American to earn a degree in art from the University of Nebraska and is considered a pre-eminent artist of the Harlem Renaissance movement. The professorship is a five-year renewable appointment and carries a $5,000 annual stipend.
  • UNL Assistant Professor of Mathematics and NMSSI professor Christine Kelley was a recipient of a College of Arts & Sciences Distinguished Teaching Award by the Office of the Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs on April 2, 2012. She will be recognized at the Honors Convocation on April 22.
  • The progress of the five-year, $9.2 million NebraskaMATH grant over Years 2 and 3 (2010-11) is featured in "Report to Nebraska 12.2011." Read about the recent highlights of the Primarily Math, Nebraska Algebra and New Teacher Network programs, as well as updates on teachers earning master's degrees, the online community, and associated programs that further the long-term mission of NebraskaMATH. Download a copy of this magazine here. To receive a hard copy, contact the Center for Science, Mathematics & Computer Education at (402) 472-8965.
  • As the $5.9 million Math in the Middle Institute Partnership came to a close in 2011, the grant and its success has had an enormous impact, greatly benefitting K-12 mathematics education in Nebraska's schools. "Making an Impact: Final Report 2004-11" looks back at the scope of the partnership and the outcomes of its teaching methods and research. Download a copy of this magazine here. To receive a hard copy, contact the Center for Science, Mathematics & Computer Education at (402) 472-8965.
  • The Discipline-Based Education Research group at UNL is offering a spring lecture series with a focus on STEM education research. The group meets every other week, Jan. 17 to April 17, in Bessey Hall, room 219. Meeting start times rotate and are noon to 1 p.m. or 3 to 4 p.m. The first meeting, 3 to 4 p.m., Jan. 17, will feature Leilani Arthurs presenting "Development of a Concept Inventory Assessment Instrument: Example from Oceanography." Arthurs is an assistant professor in earth and atmospheric sciences. The DBER Group meetings are intended to promote discussion about education, research and findings in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math. The discussions are for individuals who conduct education research in STEM disciplines at the undergraduate level. The meetings are also good for those who conduct STEM education research at K-12 levels and anyone interested in and supportive of science education research. For more information, e-mail Leilani Arthurs or Marilyne Stains.
  • NEWS RELEASE, 12/16/2011: Nebraska mathematics teachers from Omaha Public Schools, Lincoln Public Schools and Fremont Public Schools attended several national conferences on mathematics education during the latter half of 2011, as either presenters or participants.
  • UNL's Behlen Observatory near Mead will be open to the public from 7:30-10 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 2, provided the sky is clear. Visitors will be able to view the moon, Jupiter, Uranus and star clusters with the observatory's 30-inch telescope and with smaller telescopes set up outside of the observatory. At 8 p.m., Melissa Brucker from the UNL Department of Physics and Astronomy will give a talk titled "An Overview of the Kuiper Belt." There is no admission charge.
  • Hannah Sevian, associate professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston and former NSF program officer, presents "An Overview of NSF Funding Opportunities in STEM Education and STEM Education Research" on Monday, Nov. 21, 2011, from noon to 1 p.m. in Hamilton Hall Room 102. The seminar will include discussion of the proposal writing process from idea definition to proposal development and submission, with tips on what to include, and what not to do, in developing a project summary, project description, budget, letters of commitment, postdoctoral mentoring plan, and other aspects of proposal development.
  • More than 1,500 students from high schools across the state will put their math skills to work Nov. 17, 2011, to compete for scholarships and other awards at the 22nd annual UNL Math Day.
  • Proceedings for the Enacting Standards for Mathematical Practices Conference: Slides from conference presentations and pictures from the conference are now online, with videos coming soon. The conference, Oct. 21-22 on the UNL City Campus, featured five national speakers, and focused on how to enact the Standards for Mathematical Practice contained in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.
  • Love math? Learn how to teach it! Earn high school math certification and a master's degree in 14 months from UNL. Fellowships available through the Noyce Teaching Fellowship. A review session for the Praxis II exams is Jan. 12 for the Jan. 14 exams, held in 248 Avery Hall at 5:15 p.m. Join remotely by contacting Wendy Smith at wsmith5@unl.edu. Please RSVP or session may be canceled.
  • NEWS RELEASE: Aspiring math teachers can earn master's degree in 14 months, 10-10-2011
  • The Robert Noyce Science Scholars program and the Master of Arts with an emphasis in science teaching program allow you to become a secondary science teacher in just 14 months, earning both a master's degree and teaching certification. A Noyce fellowship provides a $12,000 scholarship to help cover tuition and fees for the 41-hour degree program.
  • Chemistry Day is a free fun-filled day of learning and science for high school junior & senior students, parents, & teachers, hosted by the UNL Department of Chemistry. Join us on Saturday, Oct. 15, from 8:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Hamilton Hall for chemistry lab tours, hands-on science experiments, lunch, and much more. Contact Peg Bergmeyer at (402) 472-3514 with questions.
  • Online registration and the official program are now available on the Nebraska Association for Teachers of Mathematics' Web site for the Fall Conference, "Grow with the Standards." The conference is Sept. 19 at the Holiday Inn in Kearney. Speakers include Noyce Master Teaching Fellows Shelby Aaberg, Danielle Buhrman, Alicia Davis and Dan Schaben, as well as New Teacher Network teachers Jeff Depue, Kelly Gomez Johnson and Kathy Niedbalski. Nebraska Algebra instructor Jerel Welker will be presenting GeoGebra for beginners. Look for NebraskaMATH's vendor booth where we will be demonstrating our online community, the Nebraska Math & Science Network.
  • 23 Master Teaching Fellows complete summer courses: Twenty-three teachers from across Nebraska were awarded Robert Noyce NSF Master Teaching Fellowships through the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and completed their first three courses in Summer 2011.
  • Join new online community, share with peers: Want to get connected to other teachers in the state? NebraskaMATH is now taking requests to join our member-only website designed to provide opportunities for Nebraska math and science teachers to collaborate in an online, password-protected environment. Based on the functionality of social networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn, an online community called MemberToMember has allowed us the opportunity to bring you a private, online environment where you can share lessons, assessments, teaching tips and other ideas, free from search engines. The Nebraska Math & Science Network is a great place to start a small group discussion, ask a question related to mathematics or science instruction or share your favorite lesson plans.
  • 22 Master Teaching Fellows chosen Two additional OPS teachers, Tanya Archie and Jill Luschen, were also selected at a later date
  • State Farm logoState Farm®, the nation's leading insurer of cars and homes, has specifically allocated funds to support the Nebraska Math & Science Summer Institutes (NMSSI) program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This funding allowed 32 Nebraska K-12 math teachers to take an NMSSI graduate course tuition-free in Summer 2011.
  • Students at Lincoln High School's Science Focus Program have earned a spot for their science project on a shuttle flight in July. Senior Kyle Chapo and junior Isaac Wells are the co-principal investigators on the project, which won based on a submitted proposal. The title of their experiment is: "The effects of microgravity on oil production in salt-stressed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii." The student experiments are flying aboard NASA's STS-135 mission, which will dock with the International Space Station.
  • Edwards earns award for excellence in grad education
  • CSMCE Director Jim Lewis named UNL Academic Star
  • Attend spring Dinner and a Math Problem and Math Teachers Circle events: Dates have been set for gatherings in Lincoln, Omaha, Grand Island, Fremont, Scottsbluff and Norfolk this spring. All K-12 teachers are welcome to join these events, which are designed to bring together teachers of mathematics (especially of grades 6-12) and mathematicians with the goal of discovering and sharing with students the excitement and richness of problem solving in deep yet accessible mathematical topics.
  • Attend free rural education presentation: UNL's National Center for Research on Rural Education (R2Ed) will hold the first presentation in its 2011 Creating Rural Connections Speaker Series on Thursday, April 21. Dr. Jim Knight of the University of Kansas will speak from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Unity Room of the Jackie Gaughan Multicultural Center on the UNL City Campus (east of the Nebraska Union). Knight will explore the concept of instructional coaching and its role in enhancing the quality of K-12 education. He will define this form of professional development, explain the principles on which it was founded, and specify the collaborative steps instructional coaches take to improve teacher practice and subsequent student outcomes. The presentation is free, open to the public and requires no registration. All Nebraska teachers are welcome to attend.
  • Pi Day Ideas
  • Seeking math ed faculty: The Department of Mathematics has an opening for a tenure-track position with an emphasis in mathematics education.
  • Lewis selected as state's Professor of the Year by Carnegie Foundation: Even as a teenager, Jim Lewis said he knew two things: He loved learning and he loved mathematics. But he needed more than that to find his way to what would become a fulfilling career at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
  • Register for the Winter Interim Teaching and Learning Workshop: Organized by the CASNR Teaching and Learning Improvement Committee, the 2011 winter workshop on Friday, Jan. 7, will focus on integrating systems-thinking in the classroom. Register by Dec. 10. The workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the East Campus Union and includes lunch.
  • Two faculty positions open in science education: Read More
  • Deadline approaches for Noyce Scholars program: Science professionals interested in becoming teachers have a new 14-month program available to get a master's degree and secondary science teacher certification. These professionals also can compete for $12,000 scholarships. Through a National Science Foundation program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, as many as 24 master's candidates will participate in the first of four programs to educate science professionals to become science teachers. Applications are due Jan. 21.
  • The University of Nebraska-Lincoln hosted "Making Connections in Science" with the Lincoln Public Schools on Aug. 16, 2010, to provide professional development for LPS science teachers. Professor Jon Pedersen from UNL's Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education and Kirsten Smith, LPS science curriculum specialist, welcomed the teachers and introduced the day's agenda. Smith discussed the new State Standards, a timeline for NeSA-S, and information about the CRTs that will still be administered this year. The latest version of the science standards can be found online at the Nebraska Department of Education. Breakout sessions were presented by the following UNL departments and faculty members: Chemistry (Mark Griep); Biochemistry (Madhavan Soundararajan); Health Sciences (Marilyn Schnepf); Weather and Climate (Ken Dewey and Natalie Umphlett); CASNR (Tiffany Heng-Moss and Don Lee); Biological Sciences (Chad Brassil and Scott Gardner); Natural Resources (Dave Gosselin); Physics (Dan Claes and Kevin Lee); Earth and Atmospheric Sciences/ANDRILL (David Harwood); Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education (Pedersen, Elizabeth Lewis, Jim Rynearson, Peggy Tilgner and Ron Bonnstetter); and Center for Materials and Nanoscience (David Sellmyer and Terese Janovec).
  • The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) invited educational professionals to participate in a webinar to discuss the content of the Common Core State Standards. Bill McCallum, lead writer of the Common Core State Standards for mathematics, and Jim Patterson, writer of the Common Core State Standards for English language arts, presented on the content and development of the standards. Both writers were also available for questions. The webinar was June 30, 2010, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. ET.
  • Roger HoweDistinguished Professor of Mathematics and NebraskaMATH advisory board member Roger Howe spoke at UNL on March 9, 2010. Howe is a professor of mathematics at Yale and an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences. He gave two presentations, one focusing on his mathematical research and the other on mathematics education. His colloquium talk was titled "Hibi Rings in Representation Theory"; the other talk focused on mathematics education.
  • Dr. Deborah BallDr. Deborah Loewenberg Ball, dean of the School of Education at the University of Michigan, presented "Why Should Research Universities Have Colleges of Education?" on March 1, 2010 at UNL. Ball discussed the topical issue of whether research universities should have colleges of education, as these economic times may force such universities to further examine their need for them. Ball is an esteemed researcher studying mathematics education, with a focus on the improvement of teaching quality and student learning. PowerPoint Presentation
  • Attend a Dinner and a Math Problem or Math Teachers Circle event: All K-12 teachers are welcome to join these events, which occur throughout the year. They are designed to bring together teachers of mathematics (especially of grades 6-12) and mathematicians with the goal of discovering and sharing with students the excitement and richness of problem solving in deep yet accessible mathematical topics. Read More
  • Read the first edition of the NebraskaSCIENCE Newsletter: The CSMCE and the Department of Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education are pleased to present the first edition of the NebraskaSCIENCE Newsletter, first released on Oct. 25, 2010. Inside you will find information about a Spring 2011 science and math education graduate course and meet some of the science teachers involved with the Science New Teacher Network. If you have an item for a future newsletter, please e-mail .
  • The Nebraska Summit on Mathematics Education was held on December 14, 2009, in Lincoln. Speakers included Governor Heinenman, Commissioner of Education Roger Breed, University of Nebraska President J.B. Milliken, and Cathy Seeley. Featured speakers included personnel from Nebraska's Department of Education, college and university faculty, and teachers and administrators from school districts throughout the state.
  • Carolyn Edwards, Willa Cather Professor of Psychology and Child, Youth & Family Studies, received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the North American Reggio Emilia Alliance. Currently Edwards is a P.I. for the NebraskaMATH grant with particular interest in Primarily Math. The NAREA is a network of educators, parents and advocates working to raise the quality of life and the quality of schools and centers for young children. The group is named after an Italian city that is well-known for the high quality and innovations of its public early childhood system for children from birth to 6.
  • Matt LarsonMatthew R. Larson, Curriculum Specialist for Mathematics at Lincoln Public Schools, was one of four individuals to be elected to the 2009 National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Board of Directors. Larson is a member of the NebraskaMATH leadership team, and in particular, plays a major role in guiding the Primarily Math program. The following four educators were elected to serve three-year terms: Anne M. Collins, Lesley University, Cambridge, Mass.; Debbie Duvall, Elk Island Public Schools, Edmonton, Alberta; Larson, Lincoln Public Schools; and Kimberly Mueller, Florence L. Walther School, Lumberton, N.J. The new members' terms of service (2010-2013) will begin at the conclusion of the NCTM Annual Meeting in San Diego in April 2010. The Board of Directors makes decisions about Council actions, policies and programs.
  • Dr. Kevin LeeDr. Kevin Lee, Research Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, received the 2009 UCEA Great Plains Region Excellence in Teaching Award. The award is presented to individuals who have provided outstanding teaching, course development, mentoring of students, and service to continuing education, including distance education.
  • CSMCE Director Dr. Jim Lewis has been named a UNL John Weaver or Aaron Douglas Professor of Teaching Excellence and is also the 2009 recipient of the Louise Pound-George Howard Distinguished Career Award. The Louise Pound-George Howard Award is conferred on an individual who, during his or her career at UNL, has made an exceptional contribution to the University: the award reflects a long-standing commitment to the University. The award is conferred by the faculty senate on recommendation from the Committee on Honorary Degrees. The Weaver/Douglas Professorships for Teaching Excellence were established this year: they are awarded to faculty who demonstrate a sustained and extraordinary level of teaching excellence and national visibility for instructional activities and/or practice. This Professorship is awarded by the Chancellor on recommendation from the Committee on University Professorships.
  • NebraskaMATH Year 1 Report: NebraskaMATH is a 5-year, $9,235,407, Targeted Math and Science Partnership funded by the National Science Foundation that began on January 1, 2009. In this year 1 report, read about the three programs funded by the grant: Primarily Math, Nebraska Algebra, and the New Teacher Network.
  • Math in the Middle Report to Nebraska: The Math in the Middle (M2) Institute Partnership is now in its sixth year and has evolved into part of the larger NebraskaMATH partnership. This Report to Nebraska is designed to look back at how the partnership got started; to assess what has been accomplished; and to consider what lessons might be learned as Nebraska teachers, education leaders and public policy leaders work together with the common goal of making Nebraska a national leader with respect to K-12 mathematics education.

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