Nebraska Math & Science Summer Institutes 2018

2018 Course Catalog

NMSSI Course Catalog Filters
All Courses|Math|ScienceAll Grades|K|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10|11|12All Regions|Western|South Central|North Central|Eastern|Online
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Click course numbers for full course information Primary Audience Highlight primary audience Secondary Audience Highlight secondary audience

NMSSI Courses for Science Teachers

GEOS 898 - Methods in Geoscience Field Instruction

Audience: K123456789101112
Credit Hours: 3
Location: Fieldwork
Dates: June 7 (on campus), June 8 (depart at 8am), June 22 (return by 5pm)
A 16-day, inquiry-based geology field course in which participants will enhance their inquiry skills and experience learning (and camping) in the great outdoors across Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming. The primary aim of this course is to improve educators' ability to teach inquiry, gain knowledge and understanding of geoscience, and to demonstrate effective teaching methods for 6-12 learning environments. Participants will discover, observe and study a variety of natural phenomena, focusing on Earth processes and geological history. Enrollment is limited to 9.

GEOS 898 - Nebraska Geology Through Time

Audience: K123456789101112
Credit Hours: 3
Location: Lincoln
Dates: July 9-13, 8am - 5pm
This course is a one-week tour through key events in the geologic history of Nebraska. We will begin 1.8 billion years ago, with the mountain-building events that created the oldest rocks in Nebraska. Subsequently, we will step through time in chronological order, taking a couple of half-day field trips to look at ~300 million-year-old rocks within easy driving distance of Lincoln. The course includes a tour of the paleontology displays in the State Museum, learning in detail about the Highway Paleontology program and Nebraska's Cenozoic Megafauna. We will finish with an overview of relatively recent (~5 million year) geomorphologic and geologic process in Nebraska, so that students are equipped to incorporate a Nebraska-based examples into a variety of learning modules.

GEOS 898 - Weather, Climate and Climate Change

Audience: K123456789101112
Credit Hours: 3
Location: Online
Dates: June 4-July 6
This course will cover the scientific principles that govern our planet's weather and climate, and will demonstrate ways to teach these concepts to students using experiments and observations. Participants will leave the course with the confidence, knowledge and resources to teach their students about weather, climate, and climate change. The online section of this course does not qualify for the 20% tuition discount.

SCIL 800 - Experiential Learning in Food, Energy and Water Systems II

Audience: K123456789101112
Credit Hours: 3
Location: Lincoln
Dates: June 11-15, 8am - 5pm
A 1-week workshop designed to support current middle- and high school teachers to a) learn about and experience current water science research and b) translate this research into innovative classroom experiences for their own students. Participants will complete a research apprenticeship with UNL water scientists from multiple research teams that will provide them with a challenging and engaging professional development experience. The course will culminate in the development of a set of instructional plans and resources that reflect participants' experience conducting research on the state's water systems and are aligned with Nebraska's College and Career Ready Standards for Science.

SOCI 898 - Social Psychological Processes in the STEM Classroom: Activating STEM Identities

Audience: K123456789101112
Credit Hours: 3
Location: Lincoln
Dates: June 25-29, 8am - 5pm
This class covers a broad range of social psychological topics and processes to help teachers better understand how social context impacts STEM learning. Students will learn about social inequality in STEM fields, and the individual, interactional, and institutional barriers to developing a science identity for youth from a variety of social locations (rural/urban, gender, race/ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status, ELL). The class will learn about implicit bias, stereotype threat, and identity theory, and how they impact formal and informal social interactions and learning in the STEM classroom. They will learn and help formulated practical strategies to reduce their negative impact in order to broaden and widen student engagement in STEM.