Greater Nebraska Math Teachers Circle | Overview

Greater Nebraska Math Teachers’ Circles (MTCs) are designed to bring together teachers of mathematics and mathematicians with the goal of discovering the excitement and richness of problem solving in deep yet accessible mathematical topics. Join other teachers of mathematics online for an event of fellowship and fun at a Greater Nebraska Math Teachers’ Circle.

The Nebraska MTC has joined with thousands of other teachers across the nation who are part of the growing Math Teachers' Circle movement. Support for MTCs comes from the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) through the National Security Agency (NSA). This enables us to be a member of the National Association of Math Circles (NAMC). For more information about NAMC, check out www.mathcircles.org.

Starting with the annual kickoff event at NATM, Math Teachers Circles will convene online once a month in academic year 2020-21. The Center for Science, Mathematics and Computer Education will host the online Math Teachers’ Circle at Zoom Meeting ID: 942 9494 7949. The first MTC of the online series was in partnership with the fall NATM virtual conference. For additional information about dates, times or contact information, please contact us. In addition to these events, there are Math Teachers Circles that convene regularly and are based out of Kearney, Lincoln, Omaha and Wayne, NE.

Up Next:

TBD
Presentation: TBD
Zoom Meeting ID: 942 9494 7949
https://unl.zoom.us/j/94294947949

Title: TBA
Presenter: TBA
Abstract: TBA

Monthly Online Meetings

All meeting times Central.

  • Oct. 3, during NATM, presenter: Dan Schaben | Watch on Youtube
  • Oct. 21, 6:30-7:30 p.m.: Ed Ankrom and Deb Bulin, "Math-O-Ween" | Watch on Zoom
  • Nov. 23, 7-8 p.m.: Deb Bulin, "Engagement Strategies for In-Person and Online" | Watch on Youtube
  • Dec. 7, 7:30-8:45 p.m: Nebraska native Dr. Hortensia Soto, Colorado State University, "Acting out Mathematics." Soto provided a quick overview of how body movement influences the learning of mathematics. In teams, participants created body movements related to geometry facts and used their body to create a convincing argument as to why the statement is true. | Watch on Youtube
  • Jan. 7, 2021, 7 p.m.: Susie Katt, "Productive Math Struggle in Elementary Classrooms" | Watch on Youtube
  • Feb. 22, 2021, 6:30 p.m.: Shelby Aaberg, Scottsbluff Senior High School, "Teaching Factoring | Watch on Youtube
  • March 25, 2021, 7 p.m.: Susie Katt, LPS, "Productive Math Struggle in Elementary Classrooms: Part 2" | Watch on YouTube | Resources
  • April 19, 2021, 6:30 p.m.: Lenny VerMaas, retired educator, "Using 'Math Routines' to Promote Student Discourse and Develop Conceptual Understanding" | Watch on YouTube

Recorded Presentations

Saturday, Oct. 3

Video: Watch on Youtube

Title: "Teach Math to Make Sense of the World"

Presenter: Dan Schaben, Arapahoe Public School

Abstract: Geometry literally means "Earth measure." As I embark on the last 10 years or so of my professional educational career, I reflect on how I started and how I intend to finish that career. Math to me growing up made no sense, and it made little sense until I started asking my own questions in my 30s about why and how. I was so busy becoming mistake-free, I missed the big picture and failed to learn. Math is just now making sense to me at age 46, and every day another piece falls into place. Join me as I share some of the tools and processes I have used over the years to become good at sense making. How can we turn all of our students into questioners? How can we break free of the hamster wheel that is "teaching to the test"? How can math education be about measuring the Earth again?


Wednesday, Oct. 21

Video: Watch on Zoom

Title: "Math-O-Ween!"

Presenters: Ed Ankrom and Deb Bulin

Abstract: Come join us to get some activities and ideas to use in your middle/high school classroom to celebrate Halloween! If you have any ideas, bring those as well!

Handout


Monday, Nov. 23

Video: Watch on Youtube

Title: "Engagement Strategies for In-Person and Online"

Presenter: Deb Bulin

Abstract: Join us in looking at ways we can keep our students engaged in the classroom, online, or a combination of both. The main focus will be on practice and review, but there may be some ideas for presenting lessons as well. Bring some of your favorites to the zoom to share!

Monday, Dec. 7

Video: Watch on Youtube

Title: "Acting Out Mathematics"

Presenter: Dr. Hortensia Soto, Colorado State University

Abstract: Soto provided a quick overview of how body movement influences the learning of mathematics. In teams, participants created body movements related to geometry facts and used their body to create a convincing argument as to why the statement is true.


Thursday, Jan. 7

Video: Watch on Youtube

Title: "Productive Math Struggle in Elementary Classrooms"

Presenter: Dr. Susie Katt, Lincoln Public Schools

Abstract: We know productive struggle is important but how do we provide these opportunities for our elementary learners? We'll discuss specific actions to help K-5 students begin to see why struggle is important for them as learners of mathematics and how we can support students as they engage in struggle. Practical ideas to use in classrooms will be shared.


Monday, Feb. 22

Video: Watch on Youtube

Title: "Teaching Factoring"

Presenter:Shelby Aaberg, Scottsbluff High School

Abstract: Factoring is a skill critical to student success in algebra and beyond. Scottsbluff High School teacher Shelby Aaberg will share some of his classroom experience, emphasis on mathematics vocabulary, and resources with attendees. This talk will be accesible to elementary, middle, and high school teachers of mathematics.


Thursday, March 25

Video: Watch on Youtube

Title: "Productive Math Struggle in Elementary Classrooms, Part 2"

Presenter: Dr. Susie Katt, Lincoln Public Schools

Abstract: During January’s Math Teachers' Circle, the group explored six different actions elementary mathematics teachers can leverage to intentionally plan, provoke, and support productive struggle before, during, and after a lesson. These include: value, foster, build, plan, support, and reflect. This session will dive deeper into these actions, providing time for participants to collaborate through discussion and reflection. It’s OK if you were not able to participate in January’s Math Teachers' Circle, as a recap of the actions will be shared. Join us to engage with the ideas related to facilitating and channeling students’ struggles in positive ways.



Monday, April 19

Video: Watch on Youtube

Title: "Using 'Math Routines' to Promote Student Discourse and Develop Conceptual Understanding"

Presenter: Lenny Vermaas, retired educator

Abstract: Math routines can be used at the beginning of class, end of class, as a warm up activity, formative assessment, part of a learning center, hallway bulletin board, or as a class lesson. We will look at a variety of low floor, high ceiling activities to see how a few minutes can provide large dividends to help students enjoy learning math and develop problem solving strategies. Open Middle, Which One Doesn’t Belong, Picture equations, Cube conversations, Estimation 180 are a few of the sites which we will experience.